There’s a few things that those who choose it’s time to start exercising and begin their new health and fitness phase!

And majority of the time it’s only a ‘phase’, and as a fitness coach this is the most difficult client to work with, they get a kick up the bum from either themself when looking in the mirror or from those around them.

The reason they are the most annoying client is that they start running as far as possible at a comfortable pace. The chance of that individual reaching their goal of weight/fat loss is minimal, with the amount of miles and pace they’d have to run at to burn a significant amount of calories would not be achievable for the complete beginner. Check out this calculator for roughly the amount of calories you’d burn during various exercise.

https://www.verywellfit.com/walking-calories-burned-by-miles-3887154

Depending on the client, moving more, going at a faster pace than your usual walk, and getting those miles in are great for the first few weeks and you’ll see lots of gains and benefits. However, these initial achievements don’t last long and you’ll often see them staying indoors and spooning out the bottom of a ice cream tub when it’s a little cold or rainy outdoors!

From a sports therapist and fitness coach perspective, the chances of injury increases, when you take an individual who has not done any exercise and get them to overtrain. It’s also the same, and I’ve seen it many times, with even my brother struggling to run half a kilometre around the block as his shoes were completely worn in, uncomfortable and his muscles and body had adapted the sedentary state.

Any exercise for beginners is the right exercise, with appropriate planning, timing, adaptation to fit their body and goals. Remember, if you haven’t lifted heavy weights before or in a long time, chances are you’ll injury yourself the second you start again. If you start trying to run for longer then 10-15 minutes after not running ever, you won’t want to run again!

Everything you do when you start exercising needs to be enjoyable, consistent and have a purpose.

Find yourself a trainer, have a goal in mind, tell them everything about the one goal you have, why you want it, and a good trainer will get you there in the safest and most effective way possible!

The main goal for beginners is consistency, being consistent when you start training and know that the only way the other goals i.e fat/weight loss, 10k run, half marathon etc will come after.

Thanks for reading.

Aaron Goacher

Founder Recondition Me

Aaron is a graduate Sports Therapist, Fitness Coach and has been training since the age of 15, after suffering from an illness which stopped muscle growth and function, he has always had an interest in everything sports, health and fitness related.

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